Month: April 2007

Laser Cataract Removal

Alstonine, Flavopereirine, Sempervirine, Serpentine, Pao Pereira, Rauwolfia, Ginko biloba & the Work of Mirko Beljanski

Alstonine, Flavopereirine, Sempervirine, Serpentine, Pao Pereira, Rauwolfia, Ginko biloba & the Work of Mirko Beljanski

For 40 years, the Yugoslavian molecular biologist, Mirko Beljanski PhD (1923–1998), in association with his wife and research associate, Monique, conducted research into the respective roles of DNA and RNA in the development and cure of cancer, first at the Pasteur Institute in France (1948–1978) and then at the Faculty of Pharmacy at Chatenay Malabry (1978–1988). During this time, he wrote 133 papers, published in both French and international journals.

Cancer is generally regarded as arising from damage to or mutations of the molecular structure of DNA. Beljanski’s primary thesis is that cancer is caused not only by DNA mutations but also by damage to the hydrogen bonds that hold the two strands of the DNA double helix together. Like a damaged zipper than is failing in places, allowing the two parts to separate, cancerous or pre-cancerous DNA has many broken or weakened hydrogen bonds. Once these bonds are broken over a particular area of the double helix, the DNA in that area is destabilized, and carcinogens are more readily able to infiltrate and cause the molecular damage that can lead to cancer. This explains, for example, why an excess of certain hormones such as estrogen and testosterone (and other steroids, too) is carcinogenic, although they do not appear to be the direct cause of mutations.

Among his other discoveries is that fragments of RNA (which he called Beljanski Leucocyte Restorers or BLBs) are capable of rapidly restoring the depletion of (red) blood platelets and (white) leucocytes brought about by radiation therapy and chemotherapy agents. BLBs selectively stimulate the normal replication of red and white blood cells in the bone marrow and spleen, without enhancing the proliferation of cancer cells. Beljanski reported that patients who received BLBs along with chemotherapy suffered few of the expected side effects, such as nausea and hair loss, and were able to continue with their normal daily lives.

Beljanski also developed what he called the ‘contest’ – a way of determining which kind of substances could destabilize DNA function, leading to cancerous cell proliferation, and, conversely, which kind of substances could repair or cause the programmed death (apoptosis) of damaged and cancer-forming DNA. Among such molecules, he discovered, are the naturally occurring plant alkaloids, also nine, flavopereirine, serpentine and sempervirine, which are able to distinguish between normal and cancer-forming DNA, either repairing the damaged DNA or causing the death of the malignant cells (apoptosis). Beljanski conducted many trials on the anti-cancer properties of these substances. He was able, for example, to cure an appreciable proportion of mice with lymphoma. Other in vitro studies showed that flavopereirine was active against a number of other cancer cell lines (brain, breast, ovarian, prostate, kidney, thyroid, pancreatic, colon, liver, skin), including those that were multidrug-resistant.

His research also showed that the flavanone, JO-1, which contains a large amount of naringin as well as some as yet unidentified substances, prevented the multiplication (in vitro) of human cancer cell lines (colon, ovary, breast, leukemia). Under the same experimental conditions, normal bone marrow cell multiplication was not affected. He also demonstrated that these substances also work in synergy with standard chemotherapy agents, providing better results than with the chemotherapy alone.

Dr Beljanski was forced to leave the Pasteur Institute when his innovative ideas came into conflict with the Institute’s new director. Underfunded, he continued his research and the publication of scientific papers, mostly in French. His wife, Monique, and daughter, Sylvia, now endeavor to bring the fruits of his research to a wider public. Sylvia Beljanski is president of Natural Source International Inc., in New York, the US company that now manufactures the Beljanski products.

Although he worked informally with many doctors in France and Belgium, Beljanski was largely ostracized by French oncologists. For a number of years prior to his death in 1998, he was persecuted as a charlatan, despite the commendations of many users of his products, including the French president, François Mitterand. In one instance, a journalist who had set out to expose Beljanski was not only unable to find any evidence of fraud, but ultimately became a grateful user of his products when he discovered that he himself had intestinal cancer. Beljanski’s work is the subject of a book, The Beljanski Anti-Cancer Remedies: Inside the Double Helix of DNA (2006).

The Beljanski products are now manufactured in the USA according to Beljanski’s methods. They have been shown to be totally non-toxic to animals and humans in the recommended doses:

Pao VAn extract of the bark of the Amazonian tree, Pao Pereira (Geissospermum vellosii), contains the alkaloid flavopereirine (also called PB-100). Flavopereirine is a smaller molecule than also nine, and is able to cross the blood-brain barrier, making it useful in the treatment of brain tumors. Research studies, many being in vitro, have shown flavopereirine to be effective
Medicinal Mushrooms

Medicinal Mushrooms

A number of mushrooms and fungi have been shown in various studies to contain substances (mostly complex polysaccharides) that stimulate the body’s immune system (particularly its T-cell lymphocytes, macrophages, and natural killer cells) to destroy cancer cells, lessen the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and combat viral infections. In some instances, tumors have been entirely eliminated. Most of these mushrooms have long been used in traditional Chinese medicine, dating back to at least 100 AD, and have been eaten as food for thousands of years in the East. Among the world’s edible mushrooms, shiitake are second in popularity only to the common button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus).

Six species are of particular interest: reishi (Ganoderma lucidum), shiitake (Lentinula edodes), maitake (Grifola frondosa),Cordyceps sinensis,Trametes or Coriolus versicolor, and Agaricus blazei muril (ABM). The latter originated in Brazil, but has been cultivated in Japan since 1965, where it is known as Himematsutake. Since at least the 1960s, a considerable amount of scientific research has been and is being conducted (especially in Japan and China) into the anti-cancer substances found in these six mushrooms.

Medicinal mushrooms are available commercially as dried powdered whole mushrooms, as a dried extract, or as a liquid extract. Depending upon your local climate, it may also be possible to grow them for yourself. Extracts can be made in warm water over a period of 2-6 hours, or in hot water over a shorter period. A few manufacturers first use hot water, and then alcohol, to maximize the volume and variety of substances extracted. Products can be made from the mycelium and/or from the fruiting body, between which there is a difference in the level of active anti-cancer substances. Which extraction method is best is currently difficult to determine, especially in the absence of data from laboratory trials. The best method of extraction may even vary from one mushroom to another. Growing methods can also result in considerable variations in the quantity of the active substances present. But again – despite all the assertions of manufacturers and other ‘experts’ – there is minimal published data on which to base any decision. Having reviewed the literature (often in confusion!), I suspect that extracts using both water and alcohol are probably best. This is also the form used by both Dr Julian Kenyon of the Dove Clinic in the UK and Dr Etienne Callebout of Harley Street, London.

I guess that until there is standardization and each manufacturer measures and publishes the levels of active ingredients in their products (an expensive procedure), there will always be uncertainty over quality. Presently, many manufacturers actually play on this uncertainty when promoting their own particular brands, something that they could eliminate by publishing the relevant data. And until there are full-scale clinical trials, the dosage will remain a matter of informed guesswork. Personally, I am using the extracts from mushrooms grown and processed by Fruiting Bodies, at their place in Wales.

A number of extracts of the active compounds found in shiitake mushrooms are sold as proprietary products. These include lentinan (shown in trials to stop or slow tumor growth) and eritadenine (thought to help in the reduction of blood clots and to lower cholesterol by blocking the way cholesterol is absorbed into the bloodstream). Another product – active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) – a proprietary extract prepared from several species of medicinal mushroom, including shiitake, is claimed to effectively inhibit tumor growth and lessen the side effects of chemotherapy. However, full details of the mushroom species used and the method of preparation are not disclosed by the producers, and most of their claims relate to the properties of medicinal mushrooms in general, rather than AHCC in particular.

Other proprietary mushroom compounds, including grifolan (from maitake), schizophyllan (from Schizophyllum commune), and SSG (from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum), are available in Japan, where lentinan and schizophyllan have been approved as anti-cancer drugs. It is worth noting that many of the animal and human clinical studies of lentinan have been made using an injected form. The efficacy of lentinan when taken orally remains uncertain.

Occasional side effects seem to be restricted to diarrhea and bloating, which generally go away after a few days. Allergic responses affecting the skin, nose, throat, or lungs have also been reported by some people.

Note that Agaricus blaze contains a small number of carcinogenic agaritines, which are metabolized by the body into highly carcinogenic derivatives. These can be removed from A. blazeii extracts by specialized processing without adversely affecting its medicinal properties, but not all manufacturers take this step. So before using A. blazeii, it is worth getting clear feedback from the producers concerning the level of agaritines in their A. blazeii products. Incidentally, the commonly consumed button mushroom (A. bisporus) and others of the family (e.g. …